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Grupo Misitio

Público·80 miembros
Victor Ovchinnikov
Victor Ovchinnikov

Violin Patrol



The violin also has the effect of shattering not only glass, but even metal, its vibrations are so intense. The man who paid the boys to keep playing is a thief who has been taking advantage of the destruction it causes, robbing whatever he can, until the Flash intervenes.




Violin Patrol



This time of year it's very common to be outside and see a spider scurry across the grass. Our first reaction, of course, is to scream and jump out of the way, but a common second reaction is to assume that it's a brown recluse spider when, in fact, it's most likely a grass spider. Grass spiders are generally brown, grey, black, or beige in color or a combination of multiple colors. On average, they are about the size of a nickel or a quarter, much like a brown recluse. The abdomen will have two dark bands or stripes, usually black or dark brown in color, running the length of it. This is a defining characteristic of a grass spider, however, at certain angles or distances it can resemble the markings of a brown recluse spider. Brown recluse spiders are generally light brown to greyish in color and have the trademark "fiddleback" or "violin" marking on their back.


Rose Freeman and Anastasia Allison think nothing of waking up in the dead of night and hauling a violin and a piano up a snowy mountain. Once they find the right spot for a serenade, they each change into full-length recital gowns and break the solemn silence by beginning to play just as the sun appears. The two women call themselves the Musical Mountaineers, and they perform in remote wilderness settings for the sheer joy of it all.


Police showed up after receiving complaints about the demonstration, during which the man played violin, meditated and quoted former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. They said they arrested him for indecent exposure and carried him to a patrol car when he refused to walk.


Violent vehicles. On Oct. 13 at 11:00a.m., while on patrol, Public Safety noticed one of the gate arms to the Bart Luedeke Center staff parking lot had been damaged. It appeared that a vehicle had struck the gate arm, breaking it and pushing it aside. No one reported any damage to their vehicle and there were no witnesses in the area. Facilities Management was contacted to repair the gate arm.


Monday flooding. On Oct. 17 at 4:33 a.m., while on patrol, Public Safety heard water flowing by the Fine Arts parking lot. Upon further investigation, they observed water flowing from the ground and into a nearby storm drain. Facilities Management was contacted and advised of the situation who reported that a water pipe had broken underground.


Painting by Arie (Aryeh) Singer depicting a group of partisans getting ready to go out on night patrol. It is from a series created from 1985-2000 based upon memories and events from his youth as a 13 year old partisan fighter in the forests northeast of Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and in Belarus from 1943-1944. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna in late 1939, Arie's family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded Russia in June 1941, the area was assaulted by German mobile killing units, who with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the massacres at Ponary in 1941. As the pogroms continued into the spring of 1943, Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped the ghetto, which was being destroyed by the Germans. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, where they engaged in partisan activities. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After some years in a displaced persons camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975.


Detailed colored drawing by Arie Singer depicting an imagined scene a group of men, women, and children with backpacks and wearing yellow Stars of David walking across a yard and being sorted into lines by green uniformed Nazi soldiers. Three people in striped uniforms hold violins in the upper left and 3 people enter a wooden building on the right. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna, Poland (Vilnius, Lithuania), in late 1939, nine year old Arie and his family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded Russia in June 1941, the area was assaulted by German mobile killing units, who with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the massacres at Ponary in 1941. As the pogroms continued into the spring of 1943, Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped the ghetto, which was being destroyed by the Germans. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, where they engaged in partisan activities. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After some years in a displaced persons camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975.


Watercolor created by Arie Singer dated May 2, 1943, depicting two Nazi soldiers on patrol passing hidden partisans buildings in the forest. It is from a series created from 1985-2000 based upon memories and events from his youth as a 13 year old partisan fighter in the forests northeast of Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and in Belarus from 1943-1944. It is from a series created from 1985-2000 based upon memories and events from his youth as a 13 year old partisan fighter in the forests northeast of Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and in Belarus from 1943-1944. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna, Poland (Vilnius, Lithuania), in late 1939, nine year old Arie and his family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded Russia in June 1941, the area was assaulted by German mobile killing units, who with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the massacres at Ponary in 1941. As the pogroms continued into the spring of 1943, Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped the ghetto, which was being destroyed by the Germans. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, where they engaged in partisan activities. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After some years in a displaced persons camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975.


Watercolor by Arie Singer depicting himself at thirteen years, his mother, Chaya, a friend, Polania, and two other partisans leaving their camp clearing to go into the forest on patrol. It is from a series created from 1985-2000 based upon memories and events from his youth as a partisan fighter in the forests northeast of Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and in Belarus from 1943-1944. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna in late 1939, Arie's family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded Russia in June 1941, the area was assaulted by German mobile killing units, who with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the massacres at Ponary in 1941. As the pogroms continued into the spring of 1943, Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped the ghetto, which was being destroyed by the Germans. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, where they engaged in partisan activities. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After some years in a displaced persons camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975.


Watercolor by Arie Singer depicting two German soldiers on patrol walking past a partisan encampment. It is from a series created from 1985-2000 based upon memories and events from his youth as a 13 year old partisan fighter in the forests northeast of Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and in Belarus from 1943-1944. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna in late 1939, Arie's family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded Russia in June 1941, the area was assaulted by German mobile killing units, who with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the massacres at Ponary in 1941. As the pogroms continued into the spring of 1943, Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped the ghetto, which was being destroyed by the Germans. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, where they engaged in partisan activities. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After some years in a displaced persons camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975.


Watercolor by Arie Singer of his 13 year old self, Aryeh, hiding in a cabin as an SS patrol walks nearby. It was created by Singer, part of a series circa 1985-2000, based upon his memories as a 13 year old partisan fighter in the forests near Vilna, Poland, (Vilnius, Lithuania) and Belarus circa 1943-1944. After the Soviet occupation of Vilna in late 1939, Arie's family fled to Glembokie (Hlybokaye, Belarus). When Germany invaded in June 1941, German mobile killing units, with the help of the local populace, murdered thousands of Jews. Arie and his mother were forced into the Jewish ghetto. His father, Zvi, age 38, was killed in the Ponary massacres in 1941. Arie and his mother, Chaya, age 35, escaped during liquidation of the ghetto. They went into hiding in the Nievier Forest near Vilna, and joined the partisans. The area was liberated by the Red Army in July 1944. After years in dp camps, Arie and Chaya emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Colonel Singer began creating this series of paintings about his Holocaust experiences in the mid 1980s as rehabilitation following a stroke in 1975. 041b061a72


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